Gary Moir

Gary Moir went to a local junior college, then to the University of Washington where I earned a BS in Aeronautical & Astronautical engineering. When I graduated from the UW in June 1966, I accepted a job offer with the Apollo project at North American Aviation, Space Division in Downey, CA. Unfortunately, the prior side-hatch design took several minutes to install or remove, and this was part of the reason that the three astronauts of Apollo I were killed on the launch pad by a fire in the Command Module in January, 1967. That tragedy caused extensive re-designs of many components inside the C/M. I supported the re-design of parts in the Command Module Inner Structures by analyzing for strength at minimized weight. Systems I worked on included the forward & side crew hatches, the crew couch & its support struts, parachute support structures, the docking probe, and many others. The Apollo program had the world's most dramatic and succinct program mission statement that President Kennedy defined: "To land a man on the moon, before this decade is out, and return him safely to the earth." This group of engineers was the most dedicated team I have ever worked with. To this date, we continue to meet every Christmas for an Apollo reunion dinner. From 1972 to 1991, I worked for TRW Applied Technology Division. This was the group that developed the Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE) and I worked on a number of derivatives of that engine and other propulsion systems. We also developed many space instruments, including: The Viking Lander Biology Instrument (VLBI) and meteorological instrument (VMI) that landed on Mars to look for life and record the weather there in 1976. During this time, I also became a registered Professional Engineer in Mechanical Engineering and expanded my expertise to structural dynamics and acoustics. From 1991 to 93, I worked at Allied Signal Aerospace Corporation's Research Division on aircraft and Space Station air conditioning systems. In 1993, I started Gary A. Moir & Associates, Inc. I am semi retired now but continue to perform consulting and design engineering jobs and develop products for various commercial and aerospace clients. In summary, objects I have worked on have gone to the moon and all of the planets (except Mercury and Pluto) and out of the solar system. My career has satisfied my wildest dreams from my youth.

Broadcast 1322 (Special Edition)

Guests: Responsive Space Live Audience. Topics: Responsive Space issues, affordable space, Israel and small states, Apollo 13, PR, California space issues. This was our annual live audience Responsive Space program from the 8th Responsive Space Conference in Los Angeles. There were no breaks in the show. We started the program with a discussion led by Dr. Jim Wertz who opened the conference with the admission that this might be the last Responsive Space Conference. Thus, we discussed the significance and the progress so far of the responsive space programs and concerns.

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