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Broadcast 1937 (Special Edition)Listen to the show!
Aired on January 27th, 2013
Guest: Dr. Erik Seedhouse
Guest: Dr. Erik Seedhouse. Topics: Dr. Seedhouse talked about his new book, "Pulling G: Human Responses to High and Low Gravity." Please direct all comments and questions regarding Space Show programs/guest(s) to the Space Show blog, http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com. Comments and questions should be relevant to the specific Space Show program. Written Transcripts of Space Show programs are a violation of our copyright and are not permitted without prior written consent, even if for your own use. We do not permit the commercial use of Space Show programs or any part thereof, nor do we permit editing, YouTube clips, or clips placed on other private channels & websites. Space Show programs can be quoted, but the quote must be cited or referenced using the proper citation format. Contact The Space Show for further information. We welcomed Dr. Erik Seedhouse back to discuss his latest book, "Pulling G: Human Responses to High and Low Gravity. I strongly recommend this book as it is a terrific resource on the subject of G-force on the human body. If you buy it using this URL from Amazon, Amazon will make a contribution to The Space Show: http://www.amazon.com/Pulling-Responses-Gravity-Springer-Popular/dp/1461430291/ref=onegiantlea20. Our 1 hour 42 minute discussion was in two segments but as our topics overlapped segments, there will be no part one and part two for today's program summary. Dr. Seedhouse began the discussion talking about the different types and sources of gravity on the human body. This included acceleration, lateral, reentry, vibrational, and more. We talked about helmet restraint issues, Formula One race cars and taking corners at high speed producing a high lateral G force, jet fighters, rocket flight, roller coasters, and more. Erik went over the proposed flight profile in g terms for Virgin Galactic and other proposed vehicles. He also talked about centrifuge research and findings with the general public at the NASTAR facility. He then switched to g-load force, fighter pilots and the Anti-G straining maneuver and breathing that they do to help counter excessive g's. Suborbital flight came up and here, Dr. Seedhouse had much to say given the small amount of suborbital human spaceflight history. We also talked about bone loss and density issues, osteoporosis, and obesity. Erik said the best physical profile for resisting high g force was short and stocky. The worst was tall and thin. Don't miss his explanation for this. He also said smokers do better in high g's over nonsmokers. Erik got lots of question about the Bill Weaver SR-71 ejection. Then he mentioned the Armstrong Line and said above that point, blood boils without a pressure suit. Erik also talked about orthostatic intolerance (OI) in the context of g tolerance. He talked about professional astronaut training for suborbital missions such as with Astronauts4Hire. We then discussed the financial problems hitting the Canadian aerospace industry with layoffs, closures, and the possible sale of valuable space hardware. Listeners wanted to know about anti g countermeasures, if any, and laser eye surgery was discussed although Erik said it was no longer a problem. Please post your comments/questions on The Space Show blog. You can email Dr. Seedhouse through me at drspace@thespaceshow.com

About our guest...

Dr. Erik Seedhouse
Erik Seedhouse is an aerospace scientist whose ambition has always been to work as an astronaut. After completing his first degree in Sports Science at Northumbria University the author joined the legendary 2nd Battalion the Parachute Regiment, the world’s most elite airborne regiment. During his time in the ‘Para’s’ Erik spent six months in Belize, where he was trained in the art of jungle warfare and conducted several border patrols along the Belize-Guatemala border. Later, he spent several months learning the intricacies of desert warfare on the Akamas Range in Cyprus. He made more than thirty jumps from a Hercules C130 aircraft, performed more than two hundred abseils from a helicopter and fired more light anti-tank weapons than he cares to remember! Upon returning to the comparatively mundane world of academia, the author embarked upon a Master’s degree in Medical Science at Sheffield University. He supported his master’s degree studies by winning prize money in 100km ultradistance running races. Shortly after placing third in the World 100km Championships in 1992 and setting the North American 100km record, the author turned to ultradistance triathlon, winning the World Endurance Triathlon Championships in 1995 and 1996. For good measure, he also won the inaugural World Double Ironman Championships in 1995 and the infamous Decatriathlon, the world’s longest triathlon, an event requiring competitors to swim 38km, cycle 1800km, and run 422km. Non-stop! Returning to academia once again in 1996, Erik pursued his Ph.D. at the German Space Agency’s Institute for Space Medicine. While conducting his Ph.D studies he still found time to win Ultraman Hawaii and the European Ultraman Championships as well as completing the Race Across America bike race. Due to his success as the world’s leading ultradistance triathlete Erik was featured in dozens of magazines and television interviews. In 1997, GQ magazine nominated him as the ‘Fittest Man in the World’. In 1999, Erik decided it was time to get a real job. He retired from being a professional triathlete and started his post-doctoral studies at Vancouver’s Simon Fraser University’s School of Kinesiology. While living in Vancouver, Erik gained his pilot’s license, started climbing mountains and took up sky-diving to relax in his spare time. In 2005 the author worked as an astronaut training consultant for Bigelow Aerospace in Las Vegas and wrote ‘Tourists in Space’, a training manual for spaceflight participants. He is a Fellow of the British Interplanetary Society and a member of the Aerospace Medical Association. Recently, he was one of the final thirty candidates of the Canadian Space Agency’s Astronaut Recruitment Campaign. Erik currently works as manned spaceflight consultant and author. He plans to travel into space with one of the private spaceflight companies. As well as being a triathlete, skydiver, pilot and author, Erik is an avid scuba diver and has logged more than two hundred dives in more than twenty countries. His favorite movie is the director’s cut of ‘Blade Runner’, his favorite science fiction authors are Allen Steele and Stanislav Lem and his favorite science fiction series is Red Dwarf. ‘Prepare for Launch’ is his fifth book. When not writing, he spends as much time as possible in Kona on the Big Island of Hawaii and at his real home in Sandefjord, Norway. Erik lives with his wife and two cats on the Niagara Escarpment in Canada.

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